Self-Published Saturday: Review of Framed by Gail Meath

Self-Published Saturday is my effort to highlight self-published and Indie books and help the authors with the daunting task of marketing. Below is a review of Framed, Book 2 in the Jax Diamond Mystery series by Gail Meath. I must disclose before you read the review that I edited this book.

BOOK DESCRIPTION

Things get pretty sticky for PI Jax Diamond and his courageous canine partner, Ace, when their best friend, a cop, is framed for murder. And not just anyone’s murder. The victim is the fiancée of the most notorious gangster in the city, Orin Marino, Jax’s worst enemy.

Laura Graystone, the budding Broadway Star and Jax’s new squeeze, proves to be an ingenious partner as they sift through clues trying to find the real murderer. But when Jax is pinched for another crime, Laura and Ace are forced to go undercover.

Hang on to your seat as Jax, Laura and Ace take you on another crazy, whodunit ride during the Roaring Twenties. Where no one is who they seem, and those who do, aren’t. Anything goes during an era of fun and frolic, song and dance, speakeasies, gangsters, bootlegging, and bribes.

BOOK REVIEW

Jax, Laura, and Ace are back, and the adventure starts immediately when Jax’s best friend Tim, a cop, is framed for murder. Can Jax clear Tim’s name or will he go down too? Laura is on hand to help, and Ace is more involved than ever as they face off with Jax’s enemy Orin Marino and try to find the real killer.

These three characters are becoming so dear to me. Jax is smart, rough around the edges, and extremely loyal to his friends. Laura is a capable and multi-talented woman who refuses to sit in the background for her own safety. Ace is the smartest dog on the planet. All three of them together make the perfect team. The character development of secondary characters also shone in this one, as we got to learn more about the fiery Carla and her falsely accused cop husband Tim. The descriptions of the clubs and lounges of the 1920s transport us there instantly, and we learn how speakeasies worked in the time of prohibition. Ace was even more involved in this novel, and I adored it. He takes the book to greater heights and makes us all fall in love with him. The music of the era is highlighted, as Laura sings some of the great songs of the period.

Packed with mystery, history, and canine heroism, this book will keep you entertained and guessing until the end.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Gail Meath

Award-winning author Gail Meath writes historical romance novels that will whisk you away to another time and place in history where you will meet fascinating characters, both fictional and real, who will capture your heart and soul. Meath loves writing about little or unknown people, places and events in history, rather than relying on the typical stories and settings.

The subgenres of her books vary from action-packed westerns, plot twisting murder mysteries and biographies of powerful women who defied the strict rules of society fighting for the freedom of their countries. Her romances may exclude steamy sexual scenes, yet the intensity between heroine and hero will satisfy your deepest fantasies.

Outside of writing, she spends loads of time with her husband, children and grandchildren.

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BUY LINKS

Amazon Amazon UK B&N

*If you buy the book(s), please leave reviews on Amazon and Goodreads, as well as anywhere else you review books.  Some people feel very daunted by writing a review. Don’t worry. You do not have to write a masterpiece. Just a couple of lines about how the book made you feel will make the author’s day and help the book succeed. The more reviews a book has, the more Amazon will promote it.

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10 thoughts on “Self-Published Saturday: Review of Framed by Gail Meath”

      1. Is there still time in life for plain old fun reading?
        Is it life if there isn’t?
        Which gets us to: this sounds like a fun read.

        Like

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